A Reading Miscellany – Merton

Merton on the normality and ordinariness of the saint.

A saint is capable of loving created things and enjoying the use of them and dealing with them in a perfectly simple, natural manner, making no formal references to God, drawing no attention to his own piety, and acting without any artificial rigidity at all. His gentleness and his sweetness are not pressed through his pores by the crushing restraint of a spiritual straight-jacket. They come from his direct docility to the light of truth and to the will of God. Hence a saint is capable of talking about the world without any explicit reference to God, in such a way that his statement gives greater glory to God and arouses a greater love of God than the observations of someone less holy, who has to strain himself to make an arbitrary connection between creatures and God through the medium of hackneyed analogies and metaphors that are so feeble that they make you think there is something the matter with religion.

Merton, New Seeds of Contemplation

Thank you Merton. You have just put into words what I have been unable to for my entire life.

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A Reading Miscellany – Merton, Bonhoeffer

Some interesting ideas from today’s readings.

Honouring God with a mature wordliness.

I am sure we honour God more if we gratefully accept the life he gives us with all its blessings, loving it and drinking it to the full, grieving deeply and sincerely when we have belittled or thrown way any of the precious things in life…than we do if we are insensitive toward life.

Bonhoeffer, Ethics

Humaneness and the Gospel are not mutually exclusive.

Pope John could very well have called the world to peace purely and simply in terms of the Gospel of Peace. Instead he called it to peace in the name of humanity and reason. But was this a contradiction of the Gospel? No. Since Christ is fully and truly man, since the world, society, humanity, human and social life have been taken up and sanctified in the Incarnation, the Church can speak to the world in terms of humaneness, a reason, a compassion which both the Church and the ‘world’ are capable of understanding, but of which the Church also has a much deeper, theological understanding than the world.

Merton, Conjectures of a Guilty Bystander

Merton on ‘Religion’

Merton sympathizes with the effort to resituate Christianity in the world as a “religionless religion” (Bonhoeffer’s term). Religionless Christianity critiques the

“‘religious’ tactic that tries to cajole and pressure modern man, scientific and technological man, into having religious needs which he does not have. This ‘religionness’ is negative, ambiguous, and moralizing: it preaches on one hand that one must run to God and the Church as to a refuge from life, yet once one has given the sacred its due, one can be unashamedly secular as regards [to] making money and enjoying the good things of life, provided one maintains a rigid and negative set of standards in the matter of sex. One need not worry too much about things like war, civil rights, and so on, regarded as moral issues. One leaves such things to the secular authorities, and one prays for those concerned to get the right answers.

Merton, Conjectures of a Guilty Bystander

Merton on not being concerned with ‘getting into heaven’

I would even say that, like most modern men, I have not been much moved by the concept of ‘getting into heaven’ after muddling through this present life….[in the Christian tradition] I  find the strongest warrant for this immediate and direct access to God in everyday Christian life, which is to be regarded not merely as a moral preparation for a heavenly existence but…the very beginning of eternal life.

Merton, Conjectures of a Guilty Bystander

The Sin of Bad Theology: To call others ‘anti-Christs’

The sin of bad theology has been precisely this–to set Christ up against man, and to regard all flesh and blood men as ‘not-Christ.’ Indeed to assume that many men, whole classes of men, nations, races, are in fact ‘anti-Christ.’ To divide men arbitrarily according to their conformity to our own limited disincarnate mental Christ, and to decide on this basis that most men are ‘anti-Christ’–this shows up our theology. At such a moment, we have to question not mankind, but our theology. A theology that ends in lovelessness cannot be Christian

Merton, Conjectures of a Guilty Bystander

On a sidenote, I will have to read this to my DSO who mentioned John’s use of the term anti-Christ to refer to those who don’t believe in the Incarnation (cf. 1 John). I wrestled with that term on the drive home this morning.